[EBOOK/EPUB] (Celebrity in Chief)

  • Paperback
  • 280
  • Celebrity in Chief
  • Kenneth T. Walsh
  • en
  • 06 April 2019
  • 9781612057064

Kenneth T. Walsh ↠ 6 Download

Kenneth T. Walsh ↠ 6 Download Free download Ü PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Kenneth T. Walsh Read & download Celebrity in Chief F the Republic Walsh makes the point that modern presidents need to be celebrities and build on their fame in order to propel their agendas and rally public support for themselves as national leaders so that they can get things doneCombining incisive historical analysis with a journalist s eye for detail this book looks back to such presidents as George Washington and Abraham Lincoln as the forerunners of contemporary celebrity presidents It examines modern presidents including Barack Obama Bill Clinton Ronald Reagan John F Kennedy Franklin Roosevelt and Theodore Roosevelt each of whom ualified as a celebrity in hi. This book reads like a poorly edited textbook It is horrifically disorganized which factors into its repetitiveness There are entire pages passages sections anecdotes and even uotes that get multiple mention So if you find yourself asking Where have I read this before the answer is probably five pages ago The book has some interesting analysis but inconsistently delves into certain things or presidents while glossing over others The book also becomes suddenly partisan when it inexplicably dedicates an entire chapter to Obama s ineffectiveness as president with little relation to the thesis of the book There are anti Obama commentaries thrown in throughout in a very partisan purposeful manner that other presidents including Nixon and Clinton are not subjected to which makes for an uneven tone This book is essentially two books one provides a nonpartisan analysis of the celebrity of the first 43 presidents and the second is a general critiue of the Obama administration This book draws heavily from a book titled Celebrity in Chief Indeed it draws so heavily from that book that it even co opted the title

Read & download Celebrity in ChiefCelebrity in Chief

Kenneth T. Walsh ↠ 6 Download Free download Ü PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Kenneth T. Walsh Read & download Celebrity in Chief It didn t take long for Barack Obama to make his mark as the biggest political star to ever occupy the White House Over the course of his two terms in office Obama has injected the American presidency deeper into popular culture than any of his predecessors He and his wife Michelle have become iconic figures celebrities of the first orderThis book by award winning White House correspondent and presidential historian Kenneth T Walsh discusses how the Obamas reached this point More important it takes a detailed and comprehensive look at the history of America s presidents as celebrities in chief since the beginning o. Unfortunately this book has not withstood the test of time References to the idea that Bill Clinton detracted from the dignity of the presidency by playing his saxophone on the Arsenio Hall Show or by answering a uestion about what type of underwear he wore seem uaint given what s now going on in Washington DC I was curious about the book because of the chapter about first ladies but this turned out to consist mostly of well known information such as what causes modern first ladies have championed This type of information is readily available online including on the White House website And does anyone need to read this book to learn that Nancy Reagan was not as popular as Jacueline Kennedy I gave this book two stars instead of one because it includes some interesting facts

Free download Ü PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Kenneth T. Walsh

Kenneth T. Walsh ↠ 6 Download Free download Ü PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Kenneth T. Walsh Read & download Celebrity in Chief S own time and place The book also looks at presidents who fell short in their star appeal such as George W Bush George H W Bush Richard Nixon and Lyndon Johnson and explains why their star power was lackingAmong the special features of the book are detailed profiles of the presidents and how they measured up or failed as celebrities; an historical analysis of America s popular culture and how presidents have played a part in it from sports and television to movies and the news media; the role of first ladies; and a portfolio of fascinating photos illustrating the intersection of the presidency with popular culture. This one is pretty well written in semi journalistic style with a touch of flair but nothing over the top to set it apart from other political non fiction I was hoping for of a high level view of the space that the office of the Presidency has occupied in America s cultural consciousness over the years but instead we get essentially a list of examples of Presidential celebrity rather than much insight into how it developed Very early on it argues forcefully and fawningly in praise of Barack Obama s contributions to the spotlight But the author has plenty of praise to go around he writes just as reverently of Reagan s various PR wins for example There isn t a LeftRight bias necessarily just an overall pro spin bias The other presidents get Trivial Pursuit style highlights in summaries of a few pages early on and there are a handful of those big picture insights I expected but they re mostly found in the first few chapters and in uotes from other sources It s OK as far as research goes though it s not impartial in the least Plus if you re already familiar with Presidential trivia you won t find much new content FDR used the radio to his advantage JFK looked good on TV Nixon came off as untrustworthy Ford looked like an uncoordinated bumbler Reagan knew how to play to an audience And the overall argument seems to run along the lines of Presidents become celebrities as people pay attention to what they do and how they act and people like Presidents who are likeable which all seems pretty self explanatory Tautological even Maybe it s enough of a premise to carry through a Times or Newsweek article but not a full 200 pages Really the first chapter summarizes the whole of the subseuent work and the chapters that follow repeat the same points while listing examples We do get some advanced analysis of how the rise of television in American culture prompted Presidents to adapt but it doesn t take too much to connect those dots Then starting about halfway through the chapters switch to focus on one form of media movies books music and just listing what types and titles each President preferred The connection to celebrity status feels completely lost from about Chapter 11 on as if the author is just trotting out pieces of trivia A lot of the book feels like fluff in this regard like the conclusions are already drawn and the narrative is already established we re just re treading some familiar ground Some of the later chapters even repeat earlier anecdotes wholesale Like Bill Clinton s saxophone performance on the Arsenio Hall Show is covered in three separate chapters with no new details introduced each time In the end I did learn some just not what I was hoping to learn Guess it s my fault for not reading the book description closely3 stars out of 5 Adeuate for armchair political analysts and those who haven t yet read about the Presidents and their respective images It s not a bad book but it s nothing special 奔馬 uotes from other sources It s OK as far as research goes though it s not impartial in the least Plus if you re already familiar with Presidential trivia you won t find much new content FDR Last to Die used the radio to his advantage JFK looked good on TV Nixon came off as Night Moves untrustworthy Ford looked like an Dark Tide Rising William Monk #24 uncoordinated bumbler Reagan knew how to play to an audience And the overall argument seems to run along the lines of Presidents become celebrities as people pay attention to what they do and how they act and people like Presidents who are likeable which all seems pretty self explanatory Tautological even Maybe it s enough of a premise to carry through a Times or Newsweek article but not a full 200 pages Really the first chapter summarizes the whole of the subseuent work and the chapters that follow repeat the same points while listing examples We do get some advanced analysis of how the rise of television in American culture prompted Presidents to adapt but it doesn t take too much to connect those dots Then starting about halfway through the chapters switch to focus on one form of media movies books music and just listing what types and titles each President preferred The connection to celebrity status feels completely lost from about Chapter 11 on as if the author is just trotting out pieces of trivia A lot of the book feels like fluff in this regard like the conclusions are already drawn and the narrative is already established we re just re treading some familiar ground Some of the later chapters even repeat earlier anecdotes wholesale Like Bill Clinton s saxophone performance on the Arsenio Hall Show is covered in three separate chapters with no new details introduced each time In the end I did learn some just not what I was hoping to learn Guess it s my fault for not reading the book description closely3 stars out of 5 Adeuate for armchair political analysts and those who haven t yet read about the Presidents and their respective images It s not a bad book but it s nothing special