(The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley


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  1. says: Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley

    (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary Free read Ö eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ☆ Phillip Knightley FIRST DRAFTERS DEBUNKED The first casualty when war comes is truth Senator Hiram Johnson 1917Phillip Knightley is a fine journalist with a long career of first class investigative reporting as well as a number of fine book

  2. says: (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley

    (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley High 4 Knightley traces the history of the war correspondent from its first celebrated individual William Howard Russell who termed himself the father of a luckless tribe Prior to the Crimea War newspapers had relied on foreign coverage or reports from junior officers with no nose for news The popular enthusiasm for the Crimean Wa

  3. says: (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary Free read Ö eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ☆ Phillip Knightley

    (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary Free read Ö eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ☆ Phillip Knightley The first edition of this book are an excellent read that takes one through the history of western war reporting but the segments appended since then are perfunctory and derivative the work of a polemicist than a historian Since the recent cases are familiar to me it made me wonder if the earlier parts of the book would seem just as superficial to a historian of Korea WWII or Spain

  4. says: (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley

    (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley Ponderous and with extraordinarily small print I almost didn't read this one but having only it to hand upon going to bed I was sucked in finishing the thing in a couple of daysBasically this is an account of the work of war correspondents The wars treated include the Crimea the Boer WWI the Russian revolution the invasions of the USSR the

  5. says: Free read Ö eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ☆ Phillip Knightley Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary review The First Casualty

    (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley Do not always believe the things that you see and hear on the TV radio print and in the Internet It's not always what you see is what you get

  6. says: review The First Casualty (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary

    (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley THE FIRST CASUALTY THE WAR CORRESPONDENT AS HERO AND MYTH MAKER FROM THE CRIMEA TO IRA is Phillip Knightly’s classic influential and angry look at the relationship between the press and governments at war He spares no one “Had the correspondents had the moral courage to refuse to play their part in the charade the government might have been forced to reconsider its attitude” p 103 Here he’s speaking of World War I but t

  7. says: Free read Ö eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ☆ Phillip Knightley Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley

    Free read Ö eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ☆ Phillip Knightley Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley Thought provoking work that should be read by than just journalists and military personnel As a journalist in college and a military officer of 14 years now; I identify with both sides Does the military lie spin obfuscate? Absolute

  8. says: (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley

    Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary Free read Ö eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ☆ Phillip Knightley (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley A compelling detailed book about war reporting

  9. says: review The First Casualty Free read Ö eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ☆ Phillip Knightley Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary

    review The First Casualty Free read Ö eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ☆ Phillip Knightley Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary The early chapters of the Crimean War and the American Civil War lay out pretty clearly what follows for the rest of the book mainly that any contemporary reporting of war is at best crap and even likely totally wrongIn WWI the very purposeful use of “news” as actual propaganda is developed Usually with the

  10. says: (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley Free read Ö eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ☆ Phillip Knightley review The First Casualty

    Free read Ö eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ☆ Phillip Knightley (The First Casualty) [Download] ì Phillip Knightley I have a lot of issues with the book and I'm not going to list them here Besides the lack of verifiable facts and the constant use of specific chosen stories I would say what annoyed me most was the not so very hidden normative ideas Let's just leave it here

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review The First Casualty

review The First Casualty The First Casualty Free read ´ 8 Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary The first casualty when war comes is truth said American Senator Hiram Johnson in 1917 In his gripping now classic history of war journalism Phillip Knightley shows just how right Johnson was From William Howard Russell who described the appalling conditions of the Crimean War in the Times of London to the ranks of reporters photographers and cameramen who captured the realities of war in Vietnam The. High 4 Knightley traces the history of the war correspondent from its first celebrated individual William Howard Russell who termed himself the father of a luckless tribe Prior to the Crimea War newspapers had relied on foreign coverage or reports from junior officers with no nose for news The popular enthusiasm for the Crimean War finally led the Times to abandon this trend and despatch Russell in Feb 1854 and this stocky Irishman would greatly influence the conduct of the war The British army had not seen action on a prolonged campaign since Waterloo and the expedition was led by Lord Raglan who had been Wellington s military secretary Though a brave competent staff officer he had no previous experience of command in the field a fact made worse by having to rely on the worst collection of subordinate officers ever assembled such as the hard drinking commander of the Light Brigade the Earl of Cardigan Though Russell s report would focus on the courage of the suicidal nature of the Charge of the Light Brigade in Oct 1854 he lay the blame for the tragedy firmly on Raglan s issuing of commands to his commanders on the field and in not recognising that they did not share his vantage point above the battlefield Moreover at the bloody but inconclusive Battle of Inkerman two weeks later Russell was appalled at the level of casualties and stressed Raglan s incompetence in private letters to his editor who circulated them to his friends in the Cabinet The growing popular discontent was mirrored by the antipathy Russell aroused within the armed forces and the Establishment and when Raglan died of natural causes after the failure of the seige of Sevastopol Victoria herself revealed her displeasure with the Times with Prince Albert calling Russell that miserable scribbler This change in the tide of official opinion led to calls for restraint on the freedom of the press and the danger to national security posed by journalists reports such as troop movements thus leading to the beginning of military censorship Though too late to affect the Crimean correspondents due to the ceasing of hostilities before the issuance of this military order the precedent had been established Thus coverage of the Boer War and First World War would be greatly curtailed Historical research has revealed that Raglan was ill served by Russell s accounts as he tirelessly campaigned for better resources and cared deeply about the humane treatment of his men Yet the war correspondent had arrived and in the American Civil War the Union side alone was followed by 500 of them The author reveals that the pressure to provide good coverage on meagre wages led to inaccurate and falsified reports even instances of correspondents being bribed by army officers to comment on their imagined courageous deeds in their despatches In the Confederacy the position was worse with correspondents sharing the partisan belief in the South s cause The first instance of military censorship surrounded the first clash of the war at Bull Run where precipitate reports of a Union victory were allowed through but an updated account of the subseuent rally of the Confederate troops and rout of the Northern forces was blocked The mounting censorship was soon under the auspices of the Secretary of War Edwin Stanton who massaged casualty figures arresting editors and suspending their newspapers while initiating a practice which would be repeated in later conflicts of publishing official accounts of the progress of the conflict based on his own war diary the generals themselves had differing opinions of the corresponents with Grant embracing them while Herman banned them from accompanying his entourage thus making his campaigns in the west and south poorly reported though his actions effectively won the war Thus the correspondents failed to recognise his capture of Atlanta combined with a scorched earth policy in a sweep through Georgia to the sea split the Confederacy and destroyed its lines of supplies However the worst standards of the coverage of this conflict were provided by the Times where the proprietor and editor s own sympathies for the Southern cause were allowed to smother objectivity and whose correspondents biased reports would harm relations with the US for a generation to come It had all started differently with the posting of Russell whose reputation had since been further garlanded for his perceptive reports on the Indian Mutiny Yet despite his Union sympathies his objectivity would soon fall foul of American readers with his truthful observations of the panic and rout of northern forces at Bull Run and when accusations arose of financial speculation by his informing of an American business associate of the outcome of negotiations between Union and Bristish diplomats he found himself denied access to the battlefront With his departure the Times was able to appoint an individual with political views akin to the management of the paper Charles Mackay was so obvious a supporter of the Confederacy and the latter so valued his reporting of the war that his return to British shores for holiday was curtailed and his steamship passage paid for When the fortunes of war waned for the South and the Union emerged victorious Mackay would be fired and made the scapegoat for the obvious impartiality of the coverage in the Times With the rise of the popular press and widespread use of the telegraph the period between the American Civil War and the First World War is regarded as the Golden Age of the war correspondent The profession now attracted those with a thirst for adventure who had undoubted bravery and resourcefulness but also editors saw the merit of the narrative for their growing readership and thus reporters were appointed due to their literary ability in depicting battle such as Stephen Crane for the New york Journal For many of this new breed the glorification of war held far greater sway than any moral concerns as many conflicts surrounded the pacification of native peoples in the pursuit of Empire This all changed with the Boer War where British interests once the bitter taste of defeat took hold would not welcome obtrusive impartiality Kitchener s disdain for correspondents was clear from his attempts to hamper their activities during his Sudan campaign to avenge the fall of Khartoum and the death of Gordon The mutual animosity which grew between him and the reporters would foreshadow how the Boer War and First World War would pit censorship against the newspapermen Moreover aside from those shackled by the military censor many fell foul of furthering the jingoism of the time or of becoming so embroiled in the action that they forego their responsibility to be neutral observers Churchill epitomised the adventurer in search of self aggrandisement who joined the ranks of the correspondents but than others shaded the distinction between neutral observer and active combatant His undoubted skills at self promotion ended up with a lecture tour both sides of the Atlantic recounting his exploits and netting him 10000 in the process As the country entered the twentieth century the clampdown on reporting the truth had failed to reveal lessons which should have been learnt about the unsuitability of trench warfare The censorship surrounding the First World War would permit deliberate lies being told to the unsuspecting public thsn for any other conflict in historyIn this deceit both the newspaper proprietors and correspondents were complicit and the scale of propoganda was so organised that it would serve as a model for Goebbels and the Nazis to emulate The leading newspapers share the blame for this official line of deceit by publishing outrageous claims of atrocities committed by the Germans including express orders from the Kaiser himself to pay rewards in double to submarine crews which sank shipping carrying women and children The worst and most influential example of such malicious invention was the Boyce Report issued by a committee headed by the former ambassador to the US Lord Boyce which claimed to provide comprehensive witness testimony of the systematic murder and violation of the Belgian populace by German troops but the depositions on which it was based mysteriously disappeared when reuested by post war commissions of enuiry Despite clamour to allow the posting of correspondents on the front in a perfect illustration of poacher turned gamekeeper approaches to the First Lord of the Admiralty Churchill met immovable resistance Indeed Churchill would even propose to his Prime Minister Asuith that the Times be commandeered and transformed into the official means of guiding public opinion Kitchener had given the army express orders to arrest and confiscate the passport of any correspondent who managed to evade the ban and find himself on the field The official approach only changed in response to Cabinet pressure after a letter reached the Foreign Secretary Sir Edward Grey from former President Theodore Roosevelt pointing out the harm such a blanket ban on correspondence was having on failing to evince sympathy in American public opinion Despite the ban being lifted to a select group the restrictions imposed including being shadowed at all times by travelling censors made it almost worthwhile their remaining at home Even the Times would later acknowledge that restrictions aside the principal aim of the war coverage was to increase the number of recruits into the services and thereby avoid publishing the true horror of the trenches Knightley reveals that those correspondents who witnessed the Spanish Civil War allowed their own political agendas and sympathies to colour their coverage Thus interpretations of events at Guernica even included reports that this was a Republican self inflicted attack in an attempt to blacken the name of Franco s crusade The blindness which so affected such correspondents could no better be exemplified than by Hemingway s refusal to publish any accounts of the purges and executions conducted by the Communist forces despite having first hand knowledge of such events During the Second World War the certitude with which the Allies challenged the evils of Nazism allowed correspondents to identify so closely with the military that myths such as the extent of influence of the flotilla at Dunkirk and the display of courage under fire were consciously generated at the expense of reporting the chaos and acts of desertion which characterised the retreat to the coast Perhaps the most illustrative examples of colouring a victorious portrayal of events than the true nature of the defeat surround the reporting of the Dieppe raid and Operation Market Garden where casualty figures were concealed as were the blunders in military planning In the final chapters Knightley catalogues the constant pressure exerted on correspondents to restrict reporting true events in the disastrous campaigns to stem the tide of communism in Indo China An excellent work of historical research which deserves far greater readership

Free read Ö eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ☆ Phillip Knightley

The First Casualty

review The First Casualty The First Casualty Free read ´ 8 Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary First Casualty tells a fascinating story of heroism and collusion censorship and suppressionSince Vietnam Knightley reveals governments have become much adept at managing the media as highlighted in chapters on the Falklands War the Gulf War and the conflict between NATO and Serbia over Kosovo And in a new chapter on the post 911 wars in Afghanistan and Ira Knightley details even greater degrees of go. Do not always believe the things that you see and hear on the TV radio print and in the Internet It s not always what you see is what you get

Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary

review The First Casualty The First Casualty Free read ´ 8 Phillip Knightley ☆ 8 Summary Vernment manipulation and media complicity as evidenced by the embedding of reporters in military units and the uncritical openly patriotic coverage of these conflicts The age of the war correspondent as hero he concludes appears to be over Fully updated The First Casualty remains reuired reading for anyone concerned about freedom of the press journalistic responsibility and the nature of modern warfa. A compelling detailed book about war reporting

  • Paperback
  • 608
  • The First Casualty
  • Phillip Knightley
  • English
  • 09 May 2019
  • 9780801880308